Exercises    

Modes exercises

Mode chapter

1) Memorize the names, placement, and interval structure of each of the six diatonic modes.

2) Transpose each mode down a 5th, and then down a 5th again. What do you notice about accidentals?

 

 

Cantus firmus exercises

Cantus firmus chapter

1) What are some basic characteristics of a cantus firmus? Consider range, steps and skips, modal expression, among other elements.

2) With these basic characteristics in mind, write your own cantus firmus in each of the six modes, remembering to have a unique climax, and to begin and end on the mode's final or tonic.

 

 

First species exercises

First species chapter

1) What are the basic characteristics of first species counterpoint? Consider rhythm, melodic behavior, and harmonic behavior (the behavior exhibited by the two parts together).

2) Name the perfect and imperfect consonant intervals.

3) Write the harmonic interval quantities between the staves for all of the first species examples at the end of the chapter.

4) Write 5 perfect consonances above and below a chosen pitch; then write 5 imperfect consonances above and below the same pitch.

5) Write 5 dissonant intervals above and below a chosen pitch.

6) Describe and illustrate parallel 8ves, 5ths, unisons; and hidden 8ves, 5ths, and unisons.

7) Add a line of first species counterpoint above and below cantus firmi chosen by your instructor.

 

 

Second species exercises

Second species chapter

1) What are the basic characteristics of second species counterpoint? Consider rhythm, melodic behavior, and harmonic behavior (the behavior exhibited by the two parts together).

2) Describe and graph (or illustrate in notation) ascending and descending passing tones.

3) Write the harmonic interval quantities between the staves for all of the second species examples at the end of the chapter, and circle all dissonant harmonic intervals. Label passing tones with the letter "P" above the counterpoint note.

4) Add a line of second species counterpoint above and below cantus firmi chosen by your instructor. Circle all dissonant harmonic intervals, and label passing tones with the letter "P."

 

 

Third species exercises

Third species chapter

1) What are the basic characteristics of third species counterpoint? Consider rhythm, melodic behavior, and harmonic behavior (the behavior exhibited by the two parts together).

2) Describe and graph (or illustrate in two-part notation) upper and lower neighbor notes, double neighbor notes, the nota cambiata in its normal and its inverted form, and double passing tones. Indicate consonant and dissonant parts of each figure with the letters "C" and "D" (or "C/D" where either a consonance or a dissonance is acceptable).

3) Write the harmonic interval quantities between the staves for all of the third species examples at the end of the chapter, and circle all dissonant harmonic intervals. Indicate which type of dissonance is used ("UN," "LN," "DN," "nc", "P") above the counterpoint note or notes involved.

4) Add a line of third species counterpoint above and below cantus firmi chosen by your instructor. Circle all dissonant harmonic intervals, and label all dissonant figures with the appropriate abbreviation.

 

 

Fourth species exercises

Fourth species chapter

1) What are the basic characteristics of fourth species counterpoint? Consider rhythm, melodic behavior, and harmonic behavior (the behavior exhibited by the two parts together).

2) Describe and graph (or illustrate in two-part notation) consonant and dissonant suspension figures in both upper and lower voices. Indicate consonant and dissonant parts of the suspension with the letters "C" and "D".

3) Are suspensions which resolve to perfect consonances more or less common than suspensions which resolve to imperfect consonances?

4) Write the harmonic interval quantities between the staves for all of the fourth species examples at the end of the chapter, and circle all dissonant harmonic intervals. Indicate which type of dissonance is used ("S," "P") above the counterpoint note or notes involved.

5) Add a line of fourth species counterpoint above and below cantus firmi chosen by your instructor. Circle all dissonant harmonic intervals, and label all dissonant figures with the appropriate abbreviation. Remember to have a suspension into the second and in the penultimate measure wherever possible.

 

 

Fifth species exercises

Fifth species chapter

1) What are the basic characteristics of fifth species counterpoint? Consider rhythm, melodic behavior, and harmonic behavior (the behavior exhibited by the two parts together).

2) Describe and illustrate typical eighth note behavior in 5th species counterpoint.

3) Describe and graph (or illustrate in two-part notation) the embellished suspension figures used in 5th species counterpoint, and indicate consonant and dissonant parts of each figure with the letters "C" and "D".

4) Write the harmonic interval quantities between the staves for all of the fifth species examples at the end of the chapter, and circle all dissonant harmonic intervals. Indicate which type of dissonance is used ("S," "ant.," "e.t." the various "N's," "P") above the counterpoint note or notes involved.

5) Add a line of fifth species counterpoint above and below cantus firmi chosen by your instructor. Circle all dissonant harmonic intervals, and label all dissonant figures with the appropriate abbreviation. Remember to have a suspension in the penultimate measure wherever possible.

 

 

Top

 

Copyright © 2001 Irene Girton